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Waffen-WWF Death Planet Report

by | Friday, 31st October 2008
Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands was never much of a humanitarian. He first became enamoured with the Nazi Party in 1934, during his last year of study at the University of Berlin. He went to work for the death camp chemical company, I G Farben, where, according to the 5th April, 1976 issue of Newsweek, he was working as a spy for a special SS intelligence unit.

In 1937, Bernhard resigned from the SS. It was arranged that he would marry the Netherlands' future Queen Juliana. His reluctant resignation letter is said to have been signed, "Heil Hitler!"

In his book, Queen Juliana, William Hoffman writes, "Tensions [over the marriage] were not cooled when ... Adolf Hitler forwarded his own congratulatory message. The newspaper Het Volk editorialized that 'it would be better if the future Queen had found a consort in some democratic country rather than in the Third Reich.'''

In 1961, Bernhard recruited Prince "I'd like to be reincarnated as a virus" Philip into his eco-fascist schemes, when they jointly set up the World Wildlife Fund. Since then, the WWF has consistently promoted genocidal policies, such as the worldwide ban on DDT.

So it will come as no surprise, then, that in their newly released "Living Planet Report 2008" (pdf), they promote death, famine and population reduction as the solution to the "looming ecological credit crunch."

Apparently, "(t)he good news is that we have the means to reverse the ecological credit crunch – it is not too late to prevent an irreversible ecological recession setting in. This report identifies the key areas where we need to transform our lifestyles and economies to put us on a more sustainable trajectory."

And the key areas that the report identifies are, "(r)eductions in population, individual consumption, and the resources used or wastes emitted in producing goods and services" to be achieved by the middle of the century.

As is typical with such reports, the WWF offers an impressive number of pages of statistics, tables and graphs to back up their assertions. They give us a solution. But they don't, not even in one sentence, give any clue how their solution should be implemented.

Well, Bernhard is dead now. But Philip is still alive. Maybe we should write and ask him how population reduction, reduction of individual consumption and reduced production should be achieved, short of his being reincarnated as a virus.

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