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Plundering State Assets With Public Private Partnerships

by | Monday, 15th November 2010
In our One World Governance series of articles we have recently been looking at the role of Partnerships in the new system of Global Governance.

A visit to the HM Treasury website informs readers that

Public private partnerships (PPPs) are arrangements typified by joint working between the public and private sector. In the broadest sense, PPPs can cover all types of collaboration across the interface between the public and private sectors to deliver policies, services and infrastructure. Where delivery of public services involves private sector investment in infrastructure, the most common form of PPP is the Private Finance Initiative (PFI).

The Partnerships UK website tells us that

Partnerships UK (PUK) is a public private partnership which has a unique public sector mission: to support and accelerate the delivery of infrastructure renewal, high quality public services and the efficient use of public assets through better and stronger partnerships  between the public and private sectors.

In order to fully appreciate the consequences to each and every one of of us it might be helpful to watch the following videos of Joan Veon.  Joan explains how public assets are being siphoned into Corporate ownership through the use of Public Private Partnerships and PFI's. Although presented to an American audience it is simple to see how the same techniques are being practiced within the United Kingdom.

Another example of how public assets might become transfered into corporate pockets was reported by the Sunday Express who informed readers that:

A fire-sale privatisation of public assets is being considered ... Local Community groups in the form of limited companies or charities would have the first option in any bidding process and the chance to make a profit.

It's difficult not to wonder how many of those Local Community groups might also be led by a Common Purpose operative.

 

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