Series: The Weekly Nudge

Previously, the Weekly Nudge has focussed on various agendas which involve the incremental process of ‘nudging’ society towards a particular conclusion. Such groups of people that seek to persuade the wider population to accept their agendas use psychological techniques that are most commonly described as "social engineering".
To understand how we have reached the beginnings of a trans-humanist era we must follow the roots of modern day social engineering. Such a practice has been applied for thousands of years, but it could be said that only in the last few centuries has modern man wrestled with, and understood, the finer subtleties of group manipulation on a social scale.  
In the ultimate trans-humanist world, Man, or at least some men, will be able to control every aspect of living and be ‘free’ from the constraints of nature. Such men, thus, seek to control every aspect of our lives. To do this they must divide and conquer, and the most basic divide and conquer is the destruction of the family unit.
Transhumanism
Trans-humanism is a modern term that is used to describe the development of technology and its integration with people in order to enhance human intellectual, physical and mental capabilities.
Earlier this week a man was sentenced to jail for sending an offensive tweet to labour MP Luciana Berger. 
This week the media reported on the London Health Commission's proposal to ban smoking in London's public spaces, such as parks and other green areas. The report suggests that children take up smoking because they are influenced by the adults around them.
In this weeks nudge we will be taking a look at the rising popularity of the Selfie, a past time that is becoming so popular even the next door neighbours dog is doing it.
In amongst the drive for an independent Scotland, as well as the mounting propaganda calling for war, the mainstream media has continued to nudge us towards a 'Brave New 1984'. In this weeks 'Weekly Nudge' we will be considering cashless payments and their wider implication.
In this weekly blog I will be taking a look at those articles that are written or edited in a way that encourages the reader to develop a bias towards, or against, the subject of the article. This technique is most commonly referred to as 'nudging'. In some cases the desired result is obvious, however sometimes the objective is hidden behind a tapestry of entertaining, or controversial, literature.