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Since President Donald Trump ordered the US missile attack on Syria, the international media response via BBC World Service, Fox News, MSNBC, CNN and the like has been astounding. The message they have broadcast has been clear, unanimous and irrational: the chemical attack was by Assad’s Syrian “regime” and the US response has reset the Trump presidency which is now back on the, admittedly difficult, path to world salvation via American exceptionalism.
The parliamentary inquiry into "fake news", or at least the Home Office, may have certain axes to grind.
How does the "alternative" media assist the mainstream in assuring us that there is no EU military integration? 2017 has opened with a bang as the year of #FakeNews and its supposed debunking. But to debunk foreign news, it helps to speak foreign languages. Those who don't speak the language in which remarks were made have, as President Chirac once memorably said (on another issue), "a great opportunity to refrain from commenting."
Today Theresa May set out her stall. Britain is leaving the EU. Brexit means Brexit. And now, at last, we begin to see what Brexit means.
Donald Trump is soon to become the 45th president of the United States of America. I find myself wondering if he could job share; First Minister of Scotland, say on the weekends. He could work on his golf swing too.
On Wednesday 11 January 2016, Melanie Shaw, the whistleblower on the horrific abuse of children which occurred at the then county council-run Beechwood Children's Home in Nottinghamshire in the late 1980s, was given a two-year custodial sentence in a secret court hearing.
The intention for a “final” attack on Mosul was announced weeks ago. Why?
The United States was supposed to reprocess spent plutonium into non-weapons grade material, as Russia has. Russia’s displeasure with the United States’ breach of the plutonium treaty follows what is just the latest provocation from the final days of the Obama administration.
International Development Secretary Priti Patel has announced the UK's plans to allocate £750 million for “humanitarian” projects in Afghanistan.

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